The Beginner’s Guide to managing the NSX…

The Beginner’s Guide to managing the NSX Distributed Firewall with Security Policies

The Beginner’s Guide to managing the NSX…

In an earlier article, I covered what the basics of the NSX Distributed Firewall allow you to accomplish. Now let’s take a deeper look at those concepts and figure out the best way to apply th…Read More


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VMware Announces General Availability of…

VMware Announces General Availability of vSphere 6.5 Update 1

VMware Announces General Availability of…

vSphere 6.5 Update 1 is the Update You’ve Been Looking For! Today, VMware is excited to announce the general availability of vSphere 6.5 Update 1. This is the first major update to the well-received vSphere 6.5 that was released in November of 2016. With this update release, VMware builds upon the already robust industry-leading virtualization The post VMware Announces General Availability of vSphere 6.5 Update 1 appeared first on VMware vSphere Blog .


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vRA 7 & NSX 6.3 – The Security Tag Gotcha!

Lets assume you’re wishing to deploy a vRA 7.x blueprint into an environment where NSX 6.3.x has been deployed, and the DFW default rule is set to deny. During the provisioning of the vRA VMs they will of course need firewall access for services such as Active Directory and DNS to allow them to customise successfully, and here in lies the problem.

You might assume you could go about creating your security policies and security groups as normal and simply include the security tag within the blueprint to grant access to these services. However; vRA won’t assign the security tag until after the machine has finished customizing. So that creates us a potential issue as the VM won’t have access to the applicable network resources such as AD & DNS to finish customizing successfully as the default DFW is set to deny.

So to design around this you need to consider having some shared services rules at the top of the DFW rule table which allow services such as Active Directory and DNS access to these VMs, this will allow the vRA VMs to have the necessary network access to finish deploying & customizing successfully. You could achieve is in a number of ways such as creating a security group based on OS name of “Windows” and VM Name that equals the name of your vRA VM’s. Therefore as soon as vRA creates the VM object it will be assigned to the correct shared services security group and given the correct access, you can then layer in additional services using security tags as originally intended.

vSphere 6.5 PSC’s – Multisite SSO Domains & Failures

Since vSphere 6.5 came along we have deprecated a PSC/SSO topology that I have seen customers deploy quite frequently, therefore I wanted to quickly explain what has changed and why.

Since vSphere 6.5 it is no longer possible to re-point a vCenter server between SSO sites – See VMware KB 2131191

This has a big knock on effect for some customers as traditionally they only deployed a single PSC (Externally) and a single vCenter at each site. In the event of a failure of the PSC at site 1 the vCenter server at site 1 could be re-pointed to the PSC in Site 2. This would then get you back up and running until you recovered the failed PSC.

However in vSphere 6.5 this is no longer possible – If you have two SSO sites lets call them Site 1 and Site 2 you cannot re-point a vCenter server between the two sites. So if you only had a single PSC (think back to the above example and vSphere 6.0) you would not be able to recover that site successfully.

So how do I get round this?

Deploy two PSC’s at site and within the same SSO site/domain (See the below diagram) you don’t even need to use a load balancer, as you can manually re-point your vCenter to the other PSC running at the same site in the event of a failure.

Therefore when deploying multiple SSO sites and PSC’s across physical sites consider the above and make sure you are deploying a supported and recoverable topology.

For a list of supported topologies in vSphere 6.5 and for further reading please see VMware KB 2147672

 

vRealize Log Insight – Tracking SSH Logins to Edge Devices

Here is an example of a really simple but cool query that can be setup in vRealize Log Insight to track accepted and failed SSH logins to Edge devices.

Query:

Match ALL:

appname contains “sshd”

text contains “failed password” (This can be changed to “accepted password” to track accepted logins)

hostname contains “hostname”