SRM 6.1.1 Released

What’s New in Site Recovery Manager 6.1.1

So SRM 6.1.1 got released yesterday so I thought I would share with you what’s new!

VMware Site Recovery Manager 6.1.1 delivers new bug fixes described in the Resolved Issues section.

VMware Site Recovery Manager 6.1.1 provides the following new features:

  • Support for VMware vSphere 6.0 update 2.
  • Support for Two-factor authentication with RSA SecurID for vCenter Server 6.0U2.
  • Support for Smart Card (Common Access Card) authentication for vCenter Server 6.0U2.
  • Site Recovery Manager 6.1.1 now supports the following external databases:
    • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Service Pack 3
    • Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Service Pack 1
  • Adding localization support for Spanish language.

See the release notes for further information.

 

 

To TPS, or not to TPS, that is the question?

micron-LRDIMM-module

Something that crops up again and again when discussing vSphere designs with customers is whether on not they should enable (Inter-VM) TPS (Transparent Page Sharing) as since the end of 2014 VMware decided to disable TPS by default.

To understand if you should enable TPS you need to firstly understand what it does.  TPS is quite a misunderstood beast as many people contribute a 20-30% memory overcommitment too TPS where in reality it’s not even close to that. That is because TPS only comes in to effect when the ESXi host is close to memory exhaustion. TPS would be the first trick in the box that ESXi uses to try to reduce the memory pressure on the host, if it can not do this then the host would then start ballooning. This would be closely followed by compression and then finally swapping, none of which are cool guys!

So should I enable (Inter-VM) TPS?… well as that great IT saying goes… it depends!

The reason VMware disabled (Inter-VM) TPS in the first place was because of their stronger stance on security (Their Secure by Default Stance), their concern was a man in the middle type attack could be launched and shared pages compromised. So in a nutshell, you need to consider the risk of enabling (Inter-VM) TPS. If you are running and offering a public cloud solution from your vSphere environment then it may be best to leave TPS disabled as you could argue you are under a greater risk of attack; and have a greater responsibility for your customers data.

If however you are running a private vSphere compute environment then the chances are only IT admins have access to the VM’s so the risk is much less. Therefore to reduce the risk of running in to any performance issues caused by ballooning and swapping you may want to consider enabling TPS, which would help mitigate against both of these.

 

 

 

Intro to Converged Blueprints in vRA 7

Intro to Converged Blueprints in vRA 7

Intro to Converged Blueprints in vRA 7

vRealize Automation 7 delivers a new unified graphical canvas for designing machines, software components and application stacks with an underlying single unified model for both machine and application blueprints for Private and Public Cloud. vRealize Automation 7 also gives you the ability to extend or define external integrations in the canvas through XaaS. In this video we are going to focus on building several types of blueprints to demonstrate this functionality.


VMware Advocacy

Get ready for NSX phase 0: Migrate from a…

A nice article from @Lenzker on how to migrate from a Standard vSwitch to a vDS in preparation for deploying NSX.

Get ready for NSX phase 0: Migrate from a vSphere Standard to a distributed switch

Get ready for NSX phase 0: Migrate from a…

The distributed switch (vDS) is a really nice piece of software within the vSphere environment. It offers a variety of very useful features (NIOC, Health Check, Central management, LACP, LBT, Netflow, and so many (features with fancy abbreviations) more). Especially if you want to move to NSX the distributed switch is mandatory. Since analytics showed me that views about my vDS blogposts are increasing it seems that there is a demand for the vDS within our virtualized environments (it’s still an enterprise+ only feature)


VMware Advocacy

Licensing VMware vSphere for VMware NSX

If you are using vSphere 5.5 Update 3 or vSphere 6 then NSX does not require a vSphere Enterprise Plus licence however if you are using vSphere 5.5 update 2 or earlier then a vSphere Enterprise Plus license is required.

This is because NSX is based on the vSphere Distributed Switch which is part of the Enterprise Plus licence feature set.

Reference: http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2135310

Another VMware Cloud in Action — The Hut Group…

Another VMware Cloud in Action — The Hut Group Maximizes Online Retail and Minimizes Revenue Loss with Cloud-Based Disaster Recovery

Another VMware Cloud in Action — The Hut Group…

With more than 60 websites ranging from health and beauty to fashion, The Hut Group needed to reduce downtime to zero. As one of the fastest growing companies in the United Kingdom, The Hut Group has a lot to lose — up to £500,000 a day — if its sites were to go offline. The […] The post Another VMware Cloud in Action — The Hut Group Maximizes Online Retail and Minimizes Revenue Loss with Cloud-Based Disaster Recovery appeared first on VMware vCloud Blog .


VMware Advocacy

The Power of Partnership in the Cloud Era

The Power of Partnership in the Cloud Era

The Power of Partnership in the Cloud Era

Enterprise IT has a near-impossible strategic task. It must ensure that the company has the tools and capabilities it will need, without knowing for certain what those needs will be. Two VMware cloud executives explain the need for partnership and how global is the new neighborhood in the cloud era and how a new mindset […] The post The Power of Partnership in the Cloud Era appeared first on VMware vCloud Blog .


VMware Advocacy